The National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) has announced that the latest apprentice and trainee data is now available.

The latest release of national apprentice and trainee data shows there were 35 275 trade and non-trade commencements in the June 2018 quarter, down 3.3% (or 1205) compared with the June quarter in 2017.

Apprentices and trainees 2018 — June quarter, published by the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), provides a national picture of apprenticeship and traineeship activity and includes both quarterly and annual figures that can be broken down by state and territory.

Non-trade commencements decreased by 5.9% to 20 230 in the June 2018 quarter, with the biggest decreases seen in sales assistants and salespersons (down 32.7%) and office managers and program administrators (down 13.1%) when compared with June 2017.

There was a slight increase in trade commencements, up 0.4% to 15 045 in the June 2018 quarter, with the main increases seen in automotive and engineering trades workers (up 7.1%) and electrotechnology and telecommunications trades workers (up 2.8%) when compared with June 2017.

Completions were also down in the June 2018 quarter, decreasing 7.8% to 20 065 when compared with the same quarter last year.

Cancellations and withdrawals increased to 23 660 in the June 2018 quarter, up 4.8% (or 1090) when compared with June 2017. The biggest attrition was seen in trade occupations, where cancellations and withdrawals increased by 9.8% to 13 360 when compared with the June 2017 quarter.

Overall there were 269 720 apprentices and trainees in-training as at 30 June 2018, down 1.0% (or 2755) from 30 June 2017.

Click on the following link to read the report Australian vocational education and training statistics: Apprentices and trainees 2018 — June quarter.

A range of related data products, including the apprentices and trainees estimates review dashboard and the apprentice and trainee outcomes data visualisation, have also been updated and are now available.

Courtesy of NCVER